‘Because I Cannot See’ is an exhibition hosted by Miniclick alongside Brighton Photo Fringe and Brighton Photo Biennial.The work is from a Falmouth graduate Tom Pullen, that engages people with a sensory experience. Collaborating with product designers and the Cornwall Blind Association, the works include traditional photos alongside 3D tactile versions of the portraits and audio and braille captions.The exhibition forms a part of Miniclick’s “Another Way of Looking” programme throughout October 2014, Thursday Oct 2nd to Thursday Oct 16th (every Thurs, Fri, Sat and Sun). Free Entry.Private View on Thursday Oct 2nd, 6-8pm, followed by The Exploding Miniclick Inevitable – MiniClick’s launch party for the whole month’s programme. Free Entry.Tom will be discussing his work in-conversation with Julian Rodriguez at an Artists Talk on Monday 6th October at The Miniclick Business Concern at 68MS, Middle Street, Brighton. Free Entry.


To view more of Tom’s work: www.tompullen.co.uk
 
‘Because I Cannot See’ is an exhibition hosted by Miniclick alongside Brighton Photo Fringe and Brighton Photo Biennial.

The work is from a Falmouth graduate Tom Pullen, that engages people with a sensory experience. Collaborating with product designers and the Cornwall Blind Association, the works include traditional photos alongside 3D tactile versions of the portraits and audio and braille captions.

The exhibition forms a part of Miniclick’s “Another Way of Looking” programme throughout October 2014, 

Thursday Oct 2nd to Thursday Oct 16th (every Thurs, Fri, Sat and Sun). Free Entry.

Private View on Thursday Oct 2nd, 6-8pm, followed by The Exploding Miniclick Inevitable – MiniClick’s launch party for the whole month’s programme. Free Entry.

Tom will be discussing his work in-conversation with Julian Rodriguez at an Artists Talk on Monday 6th October at The Miniclick Business Concern at 68MS, Middle Street, Brighton. Free Entry.
To view more of Tom’s work: www.tompullen.co.uk

 

Focus on the technical end and don’t get caught in the trap of having an idea before beginning shooting. Ideas will come with, and be shaped by, doing the work.”

Is the advice Anthony Gerace gives to photography graduates during an Interview.

mullitover:

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

ANTHONY GERACE: A writer. This was the plan from about age 10 until I actually tried to do it, when I failed miserably and bottomed out of a creative writing program. But I bought a camera in high school so there was some inkling of what I really should’ve been in there, somewhere.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

AG: Definitely Roe Ethridge and Collier Schorr, as photographers. I think they’re the most interesting people working at the moment and I find the way they straddle commercial work and art really inspiring for its humour and strangeness. Otherwise, landscapes and the project I have coming up in Utah…That’s a constant source of excitement and inspiration at the minute.

JC: What are you up to right now?

AG: I’m about to embark on the biggest photo project of my career: I’ll be travelling to Box Elder county to photograph the Spiral Jetty and the landscape and community surrounding it. I’ll be living out there for two weeks and going to different sites daily and trying to get the whole experience of the place. I launched a Kickstarter back in June and it is now funded.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

AG: I had a few people I studied under that helped me hugely in finding out what I wanted to do: Lewis Nicholson and Roderick Grant were two sides of the coin that was the most important year in my life, my final year in art school (at OCADU, Toronto). Lewis was totally encouraging and supportive and Roderick was a source of total stress and consternation that revealed itself as a care I’ve never had from a teacher before. I love those two.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

AG: I’m based in London, and it’s really changed the way I engage with my work. I’m never sure of my footing here, which has made me focus on collage and photography so much more and made almost everything else in my life a distraction. I don’t know if it’s the healthiest place to live, or the sanest. But I love it.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

AG: Honestly, I’m just going to copy and paste this from our last interview, because it’s really held true for me: Forget about concepts, at least for awhile. Focus on the technical end and don’t get caught in the trap of having an idea before beginning shooting. Ideas will come with, and be shaped by, doing the work. The school I went to pushed concept over craft and led to a lot of lazy photography that could be post-rationalized in critiques but was often meaningless and trite. Basically, forget everything you were taught and just take pictures constantly, of everything and everyone, until you’ve realized what your own particular voice is. And then ignore that voice and just keep shooting.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

AG: Graphic design, I guess. It’s what I studied and what I went back to school for, but I really hope I don’t have to fall back on it - at least not too much.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

AG: Yes and no. I came from a city with a totally caring and supportive community and I think if you’re not careful that kind of community leads to passivity and solipsism. When I moved to London I felt anything between light hostility toward what I did and complete indifference, and that made me push so much harder to prove myself, and I think it makes your work mature way faster. But I also think it’s really important to have people to bounce ideas off of, to feel a kinship with, and to hang out with when the day is done. So, yes.

@mullitovercc

Hanna Wright photographed the final days of this year’s St Ives September Festival. The lineup included the Fisherman Friends, Kernow King and The South. 

Images@HannahWright 

mullitover:

JONATHAN CHERRY: What did you want to be growing up?

ANDREW MANGUM: I had no clue. I still have no clue. All I know is that I’m a dreamer and my passions stay the same but my vision and creative process change, which makes it hard to concentrate on one particular career path. I was always a good listener, and I think that enabled me to capture images that tell a well rounded story of someone’s life.

JC: Who or what is inspiring you at the moment?

AM: My family. Especially my 2 year old son. Seeing the excitement of “newness” in his eyes is encouraging and uplifting. I wish I could see the world with new eyes.

As far as photography is concerned, I am inspired by people that continue to work. It’s hard to get out of bed everyday and create something. And then share it with the world. For me I struggle with blog posts and updates because I want to showcase my best, but I also want to post as much as possible. Seeing other photographers work and grind away on a daily basis is very inspiring - and most of these photographers are updating with personal work, so they’re not even getting paid! That is the definition of passion.

JC: What are you up to right now?

AM: Right now, I am focusing on a documentary showcasing Baltimore Hip-Hop (Always in Que) and its impacts and effects on the community. This project started in late 2012. I went to a Hip-Hop show in West Baltimore and seeing the positivity of the event conflict with the stigma of Baltimore’s violent culture made me realize there was something special here. About a month or so after the event, I saw one of the shop owners the show was held at. We talked and they informed that one of the young boys from that night was murdered, gunned down in an alley in West Baltimore. I was stunned. Here I am, a mid twenty-something from the suburbs of Washington DC living in Baltimore. It wasn’t so much a culture shock as it was a real punch to the gut. I knew this person. I saw his positive spirit and made a connection. Then in an instant he was gone. All I had left of this young boy was a picture. An eerily foreshadowing picture where he was letting go of a paper lantern into the night sky, signifying the lost souls of the previous year. It was in this moment that I realized how powerful a photograph can be. I immediately printed the image and sent it to his family. It’s moments like these that push me forward because we never know when the people around us will disappear. All we have is our memories, but with the help of these pictures we can bring back the emotions of someones character. That is what I aim to do.

JC: Have you had mentors along the way?

AM: Nope. I’ve tried. I have probably sent more than 75 emails or letters to different editors and photographers who I look up to. Not once have I had anyone offer, or accept my offer. That’s alright. I’ve always been the person figuring things out on my own, usually failing a lot along the way. I was always the kid taking apart the alarm clock, phone, VCR and putting it back together. It’s in my nature to do things my own way. I think its for the best because I will have my own style that won’t be influenced by anyone else.

JC: Where are you based right now and how is it shaping you?

AM: I am based in Baltimore, Maryland. I just bought a house in the County with my family. It’s great. I spend a lot of time in the city but I don’t live there. This allows me to see everything with a type of “newness” - just like my son. I approach things differently and I’m never comfortable, which I think is good because it pushes me to go to new areas with my work and try new techniques with my photography. I love Baltimore. The city has so much character and that extends to the County as well. I don’t see myself leaving, not anytime soon anyways.

JC: One piece of advice to photography graduates?

AM: Keep your head low, your ambitions high, and your friends close. Photography has grown into a competitive sport but just know that your colleagues help you get jobs just as much as people you’ve never met. So, don’t burn any bridges you’re not scared to erase because as big as this world may seem, the photography world is pretty small and someone always knows someone else.

JC: If all else fails - what is your plan B?

AM: There is no plan B! This is all I got. Get rid of the safety net and it will force you to work harder.

JC: Is it important to you to be a part of a creative community?

AM: It is. I really think its the only way we can all help each other. If I make it as a top level photographer I’m going to need help and I would probably hire people I know close to me than just anyone I interview. That community of people can really help get your foot in the door. Build together so we can all thrive together.

@mullitovercc

Check out our homepage http://archive.cartelphotos.com/ to view Amy Romer’s photo story “Longing for Joshua.” A touching story that captures the unconditional love between father and son.
Image©AmyRomer

Check out our homepage http://archive.cartelphotos.com/ to view Amy Romer’s photo story “Longing for Joshua.” A touching story that captures the unconditional love between father and son.

Image©AmyRomer

Jon Denham tells us about his experience covering this year’s Tour of Britain for Rouleur magazine; he mentions the highlights, challenges and the overall invaluable lessons for an up and coming photographer.  

"Last week I was fortunate enough to photograph for Rouleur magazine at this years Tour of Britain, an annual cycle race with many of the worlds top cyclists attending. Being a fan of cycling since childhood, I was overwhelmed with excitement when I saw the applications for passes to my choice of stages had all been approved. 

The first stage I attended, which was actually the fourth stage of the race, ran from Worcester to Bristol, the second, Stage 6 was Bath to Hemel Hempstead and the third day was Stages 8a and 8b in London, of which 8a was a time trial. Each day began with a very early morning (fortunately, I’m a morning person) to collect my media pass and tabard at the start line and to make sure I was there ready for the arrival of the teams. I was unsure what to expect with access privileges, but when on the first day, I found I had the freedom to go wherever I pleased. Another bonus that I found great was, unlike other photographers assigned to shoot events like this, I was free to shoot whatever interested me. There was no pressure to get “the” shot, or to shoot, upload and FTP to the client there and then. This gave me a much more relaxed workflow, where I was able to observe and document and then edit my selection once I had returned home. I was also told, simply, to enjoy myself. 

Having this freedom I decided to shoot primarily with a 35mm lens. In fact, the whole three days were shot with one camera and one lens, compared to everyone else with two or three cameras hanging from their necks. I like to keep things simple, so I shot as if I was using film and tried to avoid checking the LCD screen, which I turned off. It worked for me this time, though I am sure it would not be recommended on all jobs. 

At first, seeing the likes of Cav (Mark Cavendish), Wiggo (Bradley Wiggins) and Marcel Kittel, all big names in the sport, I have to admit, I was a little star struck. These were cyclists I had only watched from a TV screen, and here I was with only a camera between us, shaking with nerves. My first reaction was to shoot as much as I could when they passed, but after looking at the results of the images from the first day, nothing stood out too much. I needed to take my time and observe them properly. The feedback from day one from Andy Mcgrath, Rouleur’s assistant editor, was positive, however, he did suggest not to be shy and move in closer, treat the cyclists as objects, not my idols, and don’t go where the other photographers flock to. Another key point was to take risks, to try things I wouldn’t normally try. 

So with these points in mind, along came the second day. Bath. Here I decided to approach cyclists individually and start building a collection of portraits. This resulted in two of my favourite images of the week: the close up portrait of An Post Chain Reaction rider, (and king of the mullet at the Olympic games) Shane Archbold and the close up of Cav. The latter was taken at an opportune moment, no one was surrounding him for interviews, photographs or autographs. He was simply there, focused, thinking about the race ahead. Then, suddenly, the race began. I was told to move to one side, where all the photographers had to go, but again, I took a risk, and instead of listening, I made my way through the bunch and went the opposite direction, running through the centre of Bath. Doing this allowed me to capture some of the actual cycling and catch the cyclists when they hit the pavé. 

The third and final day in London was a long one as there were two stages in one day (Stages 8a and 8b). This was however, a circuit race. This means I was able to walk up and down the course, wherever I wanted to find fans that stood out, details of the event and of course, some of the action. However, I found a lot of the action images turned out to be very similar. I’m personally not a huge fan of the generic sports photograph. I was looking for something different. 

Overall, photographing the tour was one of the best experiences I’ve had so far in my lead up to a photographic career. Seeing my work published on the Rouleur site feels good, and my next aim is for some to be printed in the magazine itself. I have taken a lot away from it, what images work and don’t work in an editorial piece, I found it’s not always ones you’d expect, I feel I’ve become more confident in approaching people, and more confident in my own work (especially getting feedback from a working editor, who has given me some great advice) and the most important point I took away, was to just have fun.”

You can find more of Jon’s images on his website - www.jondenham.co.uk and the edit chosen by Rouleur - http://rouleur.cc/journal/racing/best-british ”

Last weekend Cartel photographers Sam Barnes, Greg Dennis and Alexander Walker photographed the festivities of the Falmouth Tall Ships Regatta. As the tall ships pull into port at Greenwich this weekend we are looking back at the excitement.

The end of a long day yesterday. What a team! 
Photographers covering the Tall ships: Sam Barnes, Ginny brown and Alex Walker

The end of a long day yesterday. What a team!
Photographers covering the Tall ships: Sam Barnes, Ginny brown and Alex Walker

Yesterdays story ‘Pictures of the Day: Kenya and elsewhere’ on ‘Lens’ talks about many events happening around the world from political meetings to protests and riots.
http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/07/07/pictures-of-the-day-kenya-and-elsewhere-20/

Yesterdays story ‘Pictures of the Day: Kenya and elsewhere’ on ‘Lens’ talks about many events happening around the world from political meetings to protests and riots.

http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/07/07/pictures-of-the-day-kenya-and-elsewhere-20/

The article, ‘Red Devils’, by Stephan Vanfleteren talks about the Belgium team making it through the World Cup and into the quarter finals. Portraits have been taken of each member of the team for Vanfleteren’s book, ‘2014’.
http://www.panos.co.uk/stories/2-13-1687-2181/Stephan-Vanfleteren/Red-Devils/#

The article, ‘Red Devils’, by Stephan Vanfleteren talks about the Belgium team making it through the World Cup and into the quarter finals. Portraits have been taken of each member of the team for Vanfleteren’s book, ‘2014’.

http://www.panos.co.uk/stories/2-13-1687-2181/Stephan-Vanfleteren/Red-Devils/#